6 Tag
source | link

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast
5 deleted 2 characters in body
source | link

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough?

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough?

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast
4 added 7 characters in body
source | link

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough?

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough?

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast

Suppose we spot an Atlantic hurricane very early. How much energy should we expend to alter its track:

  • with nuclear detonations (let's forget about the side effects for the moment)?
  • with a large orbital geostationary mirror illuminating say, the subtropical ridge?
  • by any other means (microwave heating in the troposphere?)

References on these and other methods from the NOAA Hurricane FAQ:

Why the above-mentioned FAQ isn't enough?

  • It's incomplete (doesn't include heating/illumination from satellites)
  • Doesn't include a fully-developed nuclear scenario
  • Has no formula linking time since hurricane formation, energy applied and cross-track difference at landfall on the East Coast
3 added 10 characters in body
source | link
2 added 1482 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link