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Typically when searching for possible life on other worlds (aka inhabitable), scientists look for terrestrial worlds with liquid water or some other basic liquid. If a world does not havehas a solvent of some sort and some type of geologic activity (which providesis a heat source other than the starof heat and molecular diversity), then it would be considered possibly "inhabitable" for the types of life we are familiar with. Furthermore However, if a planet has some strange characteristic that would cause periodic extreme events (e.g. extremelyhighly elliptical orbit), it's environment would be less stable and therefore less likely to support life. Check out this site on the subject: http://lcogt.net/spacebook/what-are-requirements-life-arise-and-survive or refer to wikipedia as mentioned in the comments http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_habitability

Typically when searching for possible life on other worlds (aka inhabitable), scientists look for terrestrial worlds with liquid water or some other basic liquid. If a world does not have a solvent of some sort and some type of geologic activity (which provides a heat source other than the star), then it would be considered "inhabitable" for the types of life we are familiar with. Furthermore, if a planet has some strange characteristic that would cause periodic extreme events (e.g. extremely elliptical orbit), it's environment would be less stable and therefore less likely to support life. Check out this site on the subject: http://lcogt.net/spacebook/what-are-requirements-life-arise-and-survive or refer to wikipedia as mentioned in the comments http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_habitability

Typically when searching for possible life on other worlds (aka inhabitable), scientists look for terrestrial worlds with liquid water or some other basic liquid. If a world has a solvent of some sort and some type of geologic activity (which is a source of heat and molecular diversity), then it would be considered possibly "inhabitable" for the types of life we are familiar with. However, if a planet has some strange characteristic that would cause periodic extreme events (e.g. highly elliptical orbit), it's environment would be less stable and therefore less likely to support life. Check out this site on the subject: http://lcogt.net/spacebook/what-are-requirements-life-arise-and-survive or refer to wikipedia as mentioned in the comments http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_habitability

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Typically when searching for possible life on other worlds (aka inhabitable), scientists look for terrestrial worlds with liquid water or some other basic liquid. If a world does not have a solvent of some sort and some type of geologic activity (which provides a heat source other than the star), then it would be considered "inhabitable" for the types of life we are familiar with. Furthermore, if a planet has some strange characteristic that would cause periodic extreme events (e.g. extremely elliptical orbit), it's environment would be less stable and therefore less likely to support life. Check out this site on the subject: http://lcogt.net/spacebook/what-are-requirements-life-arise-and-survive or refer to wikipedia as mentioned in the comments http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_habitability