6 broken image fixed (click 'rendered output' or 'side-by-side' to see the difference; image retrieved via Wayback Machine); for more info, see https://gist.github.com/Glorfindel83/9d954d34385d2ac2597bbe864466259f
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co2co2 (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

co2 (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

co2 (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

5 replaced http://climate.nasa.gov/ with https://climate.nasa.gov/
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co2 http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-021116.jpegco2 (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

co2 http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-021116.jpeg (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

co2 (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

4 MathJax formatting of CO2
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How did plants adapt to CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ levels past 400k years? Why won't they do it again?

co2 http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-021116.jpeg (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human CO2$\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

How did plants adapt to CO2 levels past 400k years? Why won't they do it again?

co2 http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-021116.jpeg (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric CO2 has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all CO2 gone every 100.000 years and out of where has CO2 come?

But if CO2 came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year CO2 changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare CO2 eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human CO2-emissions pace?

How did plants adapt to $\small\sf{CO_2}$ levels past 400k years? Why won't they do it again?

co2 http://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/203_co2-graph-021116.jpeg (Description from climate.nasa.gov: This graph, based on the comparison of atmospheric samples contained in ice cores and more recent direct measurements, provides evidence that atmospheric $\small\sf{CO_2}$ has increased since the Industrial Revolution. (Credit: Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record.))

I'm not sure where and why has all $\small\sf{CO_2}$ gone every 100.000 years and out of where has $\small\sf{CO_2}$ come?

But if $\small\sf{CO_2}$ came from burning trees or volcanoes and disappeared because plants adapted then I have this question:

Plants somehow tolerated these 100.000 year $\small\sf{CO_2}$ changes over time which is very evolutionary small time. So perhaps adaptation was just about changing plants' composition percentages which is very flexible. When some rare $\small\sf{CO_2}$ eating trees came to be more frequent. But if that's true why can't plants change their composition again to adjust for human $\small\sf{CO_2}$-emissions pace?

3 added 321 characters in body
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2 added 58 characters in body
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