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4 Changed again the tag as per suggestion on meta
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3 getting rid of tag "earth"
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2 typo
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Weird question, bear with me. Most large peninsula on Earth are oriented southwards (and most of the rest northwards), much fewer east or west. Some examples: Florida, Californa peninsula, Yucatan, South America, Antarctic peninsula, India, Kamtjatka, Korea, Malaysia, Scandinavia, Italy, Greece, Greenland. Contrary examples would be east Siberia, Kola, Turkey. (Is it just me, or have this question ever been raised before in history?)

Is this just coincidence, or could conceivably some tectonic, gravitational or rotational forces help cause this phenomena? Maybe because the tectonic ridges in the Atlantic and the Pacific are are north-south oriented and stretch almost from pole to pole? And could that in turn be caused by the dynamics of the inner Earth?

Elevation maps of Venus are more fragmented than the continents of Earth. And Mars is half highland half lowland. Neither has plate tectonics like Earth.

Weird question, bear with me. Most large peninsula on Earth are oriented southwards (and most of the rest northwards), much fewer east or west. Some examples: Florida, Californa peninsula, Yucatan, South America, Antarctic peninsula, India, Kamtjatka, Korea, Malaysia, Scandinavia, Italy, Greece, Greenland. Contrary examples would be east Siberia, Kola, Turkey. (Is it just me, or have this question ever been raised before in history?)

Is this just coincidence, or could conceivably some tectonic, gravitational or rotational forces help cause this phenomena? Maybe because the tectonic ridges in the Atlantic and the Pacific are are north-south oriented and stretch almost from pole to pole? And could that in turn be caused by the dynamics of the inner Earth?

Elevation maps of Venus are more fragmented than the continents of Earth. And Mars is half highland half lowland. Neither has plate tectonics like Earth.

Weird question, bear with me. Most large peninsula on Earth are oriented southwards (and most of the rest northwards), much fewer east or west. Some examples: Florida, Californa peninsula, Yucatan, South America, Antarctic peninsula, India, Kamtjatka, Korea, Malaysia, Scandinavia, Italy, Greece, Greenland. Contrary examples would be east Siberia, Kola, Turkey. (Is it just me, or have this question ever been raised before in history?)

Is this just coincidence, or could conceivably some tectonic, gravitational or rotational forces help cause this phenomena? Maybe because the tectonic ridges in the Atlantic and the Pacific are north-south oriented and stretch almost from pole to pole? And could that in turn be caused by the dynamics of the inner Earth?

Elevation maps of Venus are more fragmented than the continents of Earth. And Mars is half highland half lowland. Neither has plate tectonics like Earth.

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