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This post is updated with additional information.

I am working on the Magdalenian site of Roc-aux-Sorciers. I have several blocks of limestone collected in close proximity to this site. It is located in France, in the department of Vienne. The site's parietal sculptures were made of oolitic limestone. Some of the blocks I have picked up are oolite limestones. But others do not seem to be. How would you characterize this limestone?

More informations about this block :

  • Limestone, for sure. From Malm (Upper Oxfordien).
  • Hardness : 3
  • Color : white/beige
  • The grain is fine (Very different from the grain of the oolithic limestone)
  • Some small degassing bubbles.

Thank youBloc 1.1! Bloc 1.3

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closed as off-topic by Leukocyte, arkaia, Erik, Peter Jansson, trond hansen Aug 30 at 9:17

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about rock identification requests are off-topic. For more information, see the announcement on meta." – Leukocyte, arkaia, Erik, Peter Jansson, trond hansen
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  • $\begingroup$ Is it soft? It almost looks like chalk, but I don't know the local geology. $\endgroup$ – Tactopoda May 12 '17 at 9:47
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    $\begingroup$ Not sure about chalk, I think I can see a bit of vitreous material which is not characteristic of chalk. But anyway, doing it from a photograph is really hard. $\endgroup$ – Gimelist May 12 '17 at 9:54
  • $\begingroup$ Agree (looking at a better screen now). Wackestone would be my guess, but a thin section would be needed to be sure. $\endgroup$ – Tactopoda May 12 '17 at 11:14
  • $\begingroup$ We're going to need more information than this. See here for how to ask rock identification questions. $\endgroup$ – bon May 12 '17 at 12:12
  • $\begingroup$ from that description and pictures it could just be hydrocal gypsum cement, which is common enough in archaeological sites. Was it found in situ? $\endgroup$ – John Jun 15 '17 at 4:57
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Not my speciality, but it appears to meet the definition of micrite - fine grained lime mudstone.

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