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If fully penetrating stream means, the stream penetrates fully to the depth of aquifer, then doesn't it mean that there is zero conductance or leakance? The leakance or conductance is a term used to accommodate no low conductivity sediments at the bottom of stream which usually serve as interface between stream and aquifer. Can somebody show with sketches, what is difference between the two types also including leakance or conductance term.

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Streams that are shallow relative to the thickness of the aquifer in which they lie. Such streams often are referred to in the literature as partially penetrating streams. Most streams are partially penetrating streams. Seepage between a partially penetrating stream and the contiguous aquifer occurs both horizontally and vertically through streambank and streambed materials. A shallow stream partially penetrating aquifer Image Source:USGS

There are a few streams that are deep enough to penetrate the full thickness of the aquifer in which they lie. Such streams often are referred to fully penetrating streams. Seepage between a fully penetrating stream and the contiguous aquifer occurs horizontally through streambank materials. A deep stream fully penetrating aquifer Image Source:USGS

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  • $\begingroup$ If the images aren't yours, can you source them?(likewise with the info itself if necessary) $\endgroup$ – JeopardyTempest Aug 3 '17 at 17:32

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