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I've looked at/listened to:

but I'm still not getting what this is for. Is this a "natural" way to form long-lasting sand dunes on the coast, or something more, or different?

Is it possible to summarize the primary goal of this project? What exactly is the desired outcome, or success criteria?

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From the material presented, it appears the southern coast of the Netherlands is subject to coastal erosion which requires the importation of sand to restore the coastal profile and maintain sand dunes that ensure the integrity of the coast.

Previously, sand was imported every five years and deposited along the coast by mechanized equipment, in a series of restoration campaigns. This is a very disruptive process for natural systems and the humans along that part of the coast.

The sand motor is an artificial, sacrificial peninsular of sand that will be redistributed along the coast, continually replenishing the sand lost to erosion. The slower and continuous redistribution of sand, but natural forces will allow for a consolidation of the coastal sand dunes in a seemingly natural manner that is not disruptive like the previous replenishment campaigns conducted every five years.

The continuous slow replenishment of coastal sand, also allows flora to naturally establish itself and colonize the sand dunes. Their roots acting as a mesh to hold sand, thus reinforcing the sand dunes in a natural and non-disruptive manner.

The project is aiming to produce a more natural way to producing long lasting sand dunes to protect the integrity of the coast.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's not a "more natural" way of producing long lasting sand dunes and beaches, it's THE natural way of producing long lasting dunes and beaches. Sand is always on the move unless disrupted by man-made structures like jetty's, sea walls, dammed rivers (rivers with dams), etc. This is simply using the natural movement of sand to move material from a sacrificial pile to the shoreline. If the normal supply of sand for these areas had not been cut off by human interference, this wouldn't be necessary. I think this is a huge improvement over just dumping sand on beaches. IMO. $\endgroup$ – Tim Nevins Dec 1 '17 at 18:19

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