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I found almost no information from searching Google, Someone mentioned it might be Fluorite. I simply don't know where else to look for an answer and so I am asking you.

When I was a child, my parents traveled with me to Egypt and there, they bought me a little scarab beetle carved of some stone, about 5 cm long, 2 cm width and height. The stone is whitish and translucent and glows green in the dark (for some time). I only remember that it might (just a speculation) have been in Luxor in an Alabaster workshop. But, according to online sources, Alabaster is not supposed to glow in dark, so what is it then? Can you please tell me?

The phosphorescence [nb, earlier version said 'fluorescent'] is really weak and doesn't last longer than 5-10 min so I am sorry for a bad photo, just couldn't make it better.

Daylight 01 Daylight 01

Daylight 02 Daylight 02

Daylight with flash Daylight with flash

Daylight against sun 01 Daylight against sun 01

Daylight against sun 02 Daylight against sun 02

Phosphorescence

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    $\begingroup$ does it fluoresce under black light ir is it truely glow in the dark. It could just be fluorescent glass. $\endgroup$ – John Apr 23 '18 at 1:41
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    $\begingroup$ Fluorescent or phosphorescent? The former requires UV light to get the glow, which disappears when the UV is switched off. Phosphorescent is "charged up" by bright light and the glow will decay when the light is removed (eg. some modern watch faces) $\endgroup$ – winwaed Apr 23 '18 at 14:16
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Based on the photos, the scarab might be:

  1. Glass. Man made or natural desert glass. Some types of glass will fluoresce green under ultraviolet light.

Test: Find a quartz pebble the same size of the scarab. If your piece glass, it will feel noticeably lighter or less dense.

  1. Chalcedony: cryptocrystalline form of quartz. Chalcedony commonly fluoresce green under ultraviolet light.

Test: Do the pebble test, if the scarab is chalcedony,it will feel the same weight as the quartz pebble.

  1. Opal. Opal is lighter and softer than quartz. Opal can fluoresce green under ultraviolet light.

My best guess is chalcedony or glass. It is less likely to be opal. A local jeweler that deals in semi-precious stones would be able to identify the stone for you by measuring the refractive Index of the stone.

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What you have there is called uranium glass. Its glass that has added to it in molten form up to 25 percent powdered uranium in the 40's and 50's. Its a retro-era collectable.

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