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Chernier_ridges

In the attached image, we can see chenier ridges and strand plains. How are they formed and what is the involvement of rip and longshore currents in their formation?

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The following sources helped me understand these landforms - hopefully they can help you too :)

From the Miranda Shorebird Centre: The Miranda-Kaiaua cheniers are first formed as sand and cockle-shell bars on the foreshore or intertidal flats. The bars are then moved landward by wave action. Eventually the bars attain sufficient height to withstand such wave action.

From NASA's Earth Observatory: Strandplains are built by successive additions of beach sand, usually from some nearby source. Each ridge shows the position of a prior shoreline.

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Pebbles and other mostly non-biological debris are heaped up on the beach by wave action. Then either the sea retreats or the land rises, and these features are left high and dry to become part of the landscape. An example of land rising may be found in Scotland, where relieved of the burden of ice a couple of kilometres thick, the land is still rising more than 10,000 years after the last ice age ended. Other phenomena may cause the land to rise, but the removal of an ice burden is a common one.

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    $\begingroup$ How thick was the ice sheet over Scotland in the last glacial maximum ? I don't question the pirnciple, just curious. To my limited knowledge rebound is very different across the British isles, with relative sea level rise in some parts and fall in others. $\endgroup$ – user18607 Jan 27 at 15:38
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    $\begingroup$ My information is that at its maximum it was 2 km thick. The rise of Scotland is said to have caused a see-saw movement which resulted in the south of England sinking. $\endgroup$ – Michael Walsby Jan 27 at 15:50

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