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I found this rock on the edges of a known Drumlin in North East England. It looks to be a fragment from a larger piece. It attracts a magnet strongly, it weighs 150 grams. It has vesicular holes (on what would have been the surface) with round beads of metal inside some of them. It looks crystalline in structure and has small shiny inclusions. It also looks like it has a layer section. All very confusing. Any idea what it could be?

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  • $\begingroup$ pfpfpfp regmaglypts?? was this one realy lucky? $\endgroup$ – Universal_learner Jul 22 '18 at 9:47
  • $\begingroup$ can you post more pictures of the complete piece's faces? has it a darker face? some little crust as if it were burned? $\endgroup$ – Universal_learner Jul 22 '18 at 9:51
  • $\begingroup$ what's picture 2? it is absolutely focused on the spherical form. is that a hole or what? please @Andrew Howe post some more pictures and answer the question about a darker face with a thin burned crust. I sugest you tu put the linked picture 'rock' as the first picture. it looks to appear a thin black crust, but the other face is out of focus. $\endgroup$ – Universal_learner Jul 22 '18 at 10:28
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    $\begingroup$ Picture 2 shows one of the vesicular holes in detail, it shows small spherical beads stuck to the walls of the hole. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Howe Jul 22 '18 at 10:49
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    $\begingroup$ All sides look the same colour, it looks to have been weathered. There "may" be a crust to the face with the holes but it is not clear or black. I cannot add more than 8 pictures according to the system. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Howe Jul 22 '18 at 11:08
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This texture is not Widmanstätten, which only becomes visible after polishing and etching. And it doesn't like like it anyway. Meteorites also don't have bubbles (at least not that big and rounded). Therefore, this is not a meteorite.

It also looks very much like a komatiite, but these rocks are not found in England. Komatiites form by fast crystallisation of very hot depolymerised silicate melt, which leads us to what it really is: Slag. Slag can sometimes be very hot depolymerised silicate artificial melt. Iron and steel production was very common in north east England, so this is the most likely explanation. Slag.

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