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If they used wind power to bring up cold water from far under the ocean in the day time and spray it on prevailing winds going into land, could they make it rain more in arid regions? What weather control can be done by bringing up cold water from the deep sea?

Here are some maths: If 1cm of rain for 1 kilometer is equivalent to a cubic meter of water. 1kwh can lift 1 cubic meter by 100 meters, so an average wind turbine can lift about 6 million square kilometers of 1cm rain every year. Australia is 8 million square kilometers, so 300 wind turbines can logically make Australia rainforest if clouds worked like rivers, without the salt problem?

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    $\begingroup$ creating salt water rain is wrong on so many levels. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 7 '18 at 7:42
  • $\begingroup$ salt doesn't travel a lot further than a kilometer from the coast. The molar weight of salt is 58, air is 29 and H2O is 18. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Oct 8 '18 at 2:19
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In theory your idea is not bad,But it needs to be placed as far from land as possible this is to avoid the soil on land from being contaminated by saltwater.

So spraying saltwater into the air is not usefull for creating rain over land,But it can be used to cool the ocean and the planet.

Salt water spraying into the air can possibly help creating condensation nucleus,And help clouds to form and these clouds can shade the ocean and limit the heat absorption.

But this is not as simple as it sounds,Clouds tend to form more in the evening and night when the temparature drops and not as easy in the daytime when they are needed.

Clouds can limit the heating in the daytime,But they will trap or reflect heat in the night time,And then the positive effect is limited.

I think it is best to use the hotter water from the surface of the ocean as it will evaporate faster and probably create clouds faster.

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    $\begingroup$ Clouds caused by hotter ocean surface... $\endgroup$ – Spencer Oct 7 '18 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Spencer i sort of mention this at the end of my atempt of an answer. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 7 '18 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ If 1cm of rain for 1 kilometer is equivalent to a cubic meter of water. 1kwh can lift 1 cubic meter by 100 meters, so an average wind turbine can lift about 6 million square kilometers of 1cm rain every year. Australia is 8 million square kilometers, so 300 wind turbines can logically make Australia rainforest if clouds worked like rivers, without the salt problem? $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Oct 8 '18 at 1:13
  • $\begingroup$ under optimum conditions yes,but dropping this amount of rain and the cooling of the ground over a large area will probably change the movement of air in the area,it might even reverse the flow of air so the wind might start blowing from land and out to sea.but now we are getting close to asking another question about how the atmosphere works and the interaction of land/sea. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 8 '18 at 7:18

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