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now its well known that common names are used to name weather storms but on what bases are they named ? is it the person who first notices them ? Is it the the most common name in the region where the cyclone/typhoons/hurricanes develop ?or something else entirely ?

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marked as duplicate by Jan Doggen, Fred, daniel.neumann, Community Oct 15 '18 at 3:56

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  • $\begingroup$ The information contained in the answer to How did a tropical storm starting with “D” end up next to a typhoon starting with “T”? & its links will answer this question. Basically, the regions were typhoons, cyclones & hurricanes form are divided into sectors of responsibility. The national weather bureaux for those regions prepare a list of names a number of years in advance of storm season. The criteria for choosing names rests with the individual bureax. $\endgroup$ – Fred Oct 12 '18 at 17:44
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The names are set well in advance. For example, the first four north Atlantic hurricanes in 2022 will be named Alex, Bonnie, Colin, and Danielle. In fact, the names of the north Atlantic hurricane in 2022 will be exactly the same as those in 2016, with one exception. Hurricane Matthew in 2016 was a catastrophic category 5 storm that claimed a number of lives and that resulted in large economic losses. The name Matthew has been retired because of this, so the 13th named north Atlantic storm in 2022 will be named Martin rather than Matthew. The US recycles the names it uses on a six year basis, but the names of significant storms are retired and replaced with some new name.

Names for tropical cyclones elsewhere in the world follow a similar convention. Names are set well in advance, with the lists of names being recycled after some number of years. As was the case with Matthew, the names of catastrophic storms that result in a number of deaths and/or large economic impacts are retired from those lists.

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    $\begingroup$ I suspect that the sixth and thirteenth named storms of 2024 will most likely be named something other than Florence and Michael, which will be retired. But the new names for those storms will be assigned well before 2024. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Oct 12 '18 at 11:36
  • $\begingroup$ in scandinavia norway-sweden denmark,we do have different lists with names for storms so to make it simple a storm is normally named by the first country it hits,if it hits more than one country it keeps the name given by the first country. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 12 '18 at 11:38
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    $\begingroup$ @trondhansen - Tropical cyclones are a very different beast than the comparatively puny things that hit Scandinavia. Consistently naming those tropical storms is important, important enough that the World Meteorological Organization has assigned naming responsibilities to various organizations. The assignment isn't perfect; the Philippines and Japan sometimes agree to disagree on names. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Oct 12 '18 at 11:44
  • $\begingroup$ hurricane is a measurment of wind speed en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaufort_scale ,the question was about the naming of them.and we do name them. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 12 '18 at 17:40
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    $\begingroup$ (Storms that develop in odd places, like the [somewhat exaggerated portmanteau] Medicanes, or southern Atlantic systems, have historically had somewhat less agreed upon names) $\endgroup$ – JeopardyTempest Oct 12 '18 at 17:44

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