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Whats the largest earthquake since 1900 that was not in a subduction zone (not a megathrust).

Wikipedia says that Since 1900, all earthquakes of magnitude 9.0 or greater have been megathrust earthquakes. No other type of known terrestrial source of tectonic activity has produced earthquakes of this scale.

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08/15/1950 Assam, tibet, 8.9 magnitude. according to the USGS, https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/browse/largest-world.php

Note you are talking about a very small window of time there are only 5 earthquakes of 9.0 or greater within that time frame.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is there any more distant past earthquake known for being particularly remarkable not a megathrust? It's not in his time range, but would still round out the answer nicely if you have one in mind :) $\endgroup$ – JeopardyTempest Dec 10 '18 at 22:19
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    $\begingroup$ the new madrid quake in Missouri was estimated around 7.5-7.9, the problem is estimating the size of an earthquake becomes very hard once you go back before recording equipment and photographs. without a direct record estimations can be very unreliable. $\endgroup$ – John Dec 10 '18 at 22:41
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    $\begingroup$ As someone mentioned in another question the chicxulub impact probably generated a magnitude 13 quake. $\endgroup$ – John Dec 10 '18 at 22:47
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you. I am "writing" this article: physics.wikia.com/wiki/User_blog:Granpa/Weather#Tsunami_height so I wanted to know how big other types can get. I also happen to live directly on top of the big one. USGS says The largest instrumentally recorded Himalaya earthquake occurred on 15th August 1950 in Assam, eastern India. This M8.6 right-lateral, strike-slip, earthquake was widely felt over a broad area of central Asia, causing extensive damage to villages in the epicentral region. $\endgroup$ – R. Emery Dec 11 '18 at 5:59
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    $\begingroup$ @R.Emery most of the largest earthquakes are at convergent boundaries, thats where two massive slabs a rock are being pushed together. it kinda makes sense those would be the most volatile conditions. $\endgroup$ – John Dec 11 '18 at 21:04

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