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In one of my Geography books, the following sentence is written:

Though weathering aids erosion, it is not a pre-condition for erosion to take place.

How can I justify this? Almost all the forms of erosion that I know happens on weathered rocks. Do we have any examples of erosion without weathering? As weathering means to strip off or to uncover, and erosion means to transfer.

So far I came up with one example: Blast eruption of volcano makes small stones and pebbles, which could be carried by waves, rivers etc.

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Your concept of weathering is erroneous. It is not uncovering or stripping off material. Weathering is a very slow process of breaking down rocks, soil & minerals, in-situ, via contact with the Earth's atmosphere, water & biological organisms. This can also involve heat & pressure.

Erosion, as you state, involves the moving of material. This can happen due to the action of running water, the impact of water via waves on coastal environments, wind or glaciers dislodging grains of geological material irrespective of whether it is weathered or not. Landslides are another form of erosion.

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  • $\begingroup$ even organisms can cause erosion, bioerosion is fairly common especially in underwater. $\endgroup$ – John Jan 9 at 15:51
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The case of a volcano blasting solid rock into smaller bits and pieces will generally still be regarded as weathering. Nonetheless, for your case to justify this statement, you could consider a glacier scouring through a fjord or rocky valley. However, the fact that particles have been 'stripped off' before they have engaged in transport processes by definitions means that something is weathered. Only in case of the glacier it does not act as a precondition

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