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enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description hereHey guys! My name is Brent and I found this rock over 20 years ago while swimming with my siblings in Lake Huron near Kincardine, Ontario. I actually found it under water at one of our favourite swimming spots. It’s a little smaller than a baseball although it is very dense and a lot heavier than it looks. As you can see it is A shiny silver colour with very little corrosion. It is covered entirely with thumbprint like indents and is also extremely magnetic. It appears to be made up out of many cylinder like slivers of metal which are all fused together. I’ve spent countless hours online researching and trying to identify it myself with no luck. Any insight anyone can offer would greatly be appreciated thank you.

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    $\begingroup$ it is a good start but we need more information,please take a look here earthscience.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/124/… and edit in more information in your question.wellcome to earth science. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Feb 27 at 19:30
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    $\begingroup$ This is the kind of stuff that is impossible to identify online. It is a nice and interesting specimen, and I would recommend taking it to your local university's geology department, or geological survey. $\endgroup$ – Gimelist Feb 28 at 3:33
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    $\begingroup$ The black stuff could be a huge chunk of magnetite, chromite, pyrrhotite (albeit an ugly one). Maybe some other type of spinel? The nice crystals could really be anything. Baryte? A zeolite? A proper geologist has to look at this. Not for the internet. $\endgroup$ – Gimelist Feb 28 at 3:36
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This one is going to be hard to identify from a picture but the reddish crystal in the lower picture appears to be garnet and the matrix, mostly biotite. So I'd call it a garnet-biotite schist. The holes are probably from alteration dissolving garnet. The needle-like crystals in the top photo are a secondary mineral that formed in the void. My guess would be aragonite - a form of calcium carbonate. It would be great to see a thin section under a petrographic microscope. You might try looking for geologic reports from the area to see if there is anything similar, but it might have been transported a long way from the source.

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