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Found it on a construction site. What kind of stone it is ?

I understand that it is not gemstone. It is very hard, cannot be scratched by metal, and it's smooth. Also there is no visible layers. It looks more like the wiki image of Obsidian. But it is dark green, whereas the wiki image is pure black.

Can it really be a sedimentary rock?

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closed as off-topic by user12525, Deditos, dplmmr, Erik, uhoh Sep 7 at 0:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about rock identification requests are off-topic. For more information, see the announcement on meta." – Community, Deditos, dplmmr, Erik, uhoh
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ what you have found is not a gemstone,it is most likely chert or it might be obsidian. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chert en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsidian $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Mar 30 at 13:44
  • $\begingroup$ I understand that it is not gemstone. I have added some more images under better lighting. It is very hard, cannot be scratched by metal, and its smooth. Can it really be a sedimentary rock ? Also there is no visible layers. It looks more like the wiki image of Obsidian. But it is green. However the wiki image is pure black. $\endgroup$ – Neel Basu Mar 30 at 14:02
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    $\begingroup$ it will be helpful if you give more information like where you found it and the properties of the rock please take a look here earthscience.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/124/… $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Mar 30 at 15:35
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This looks just like artificial glass (even though not as translucent as you might expect). You said it looks like obsidian - that is correct. Obsidian is glass! But no natural obsidian is this green (despite what some people will try to sell you).

The fact that you found it in a construction site pretty much confirms this.

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