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What are the hottest average annual temperature for life in the ocean to withstand? Particularly algae This could include life from all points in earth history.

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closed as too broad by Jan Doggen, Camilo Rada, trond hansen, Fred, Peter Jansson Apr 15 at 14:05

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  • $\begingroup$ If local environments matter on your question the answer must be searched at black somkers. There are thermophyllous organisms that can live over water fussion point 100ºC $\endgroup$ – Universal_learner Apr 14 at 19:26
  • $\begingroup$ I am thinking more about what I'm trying to ask and I think I'm asking about increased temperature which is meant to be caused by increased sunlight. I probably shouldve asked what would happen to algae and ocean life if subjected to 2-2.5 times aa much sunlight and mentioned that I was wondering about how that sunlight could increase temperature. On the other hand thats not what I'm asking and would be a different question. $\endgroup$ – user15660 Apr 14 at 19:34
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    $\begingroup$ Voting to close as too broad. We would have to answer this for every possible depth and current - that requires a book. $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Apr 14 at 20:34
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with JanDoggen. You have to define what do you mean with "ocean life". You mean complex ecosystems as the one we see today? Or a lonely extremophile unicelular algae would fit the bill? If the latter, most likely @Universal_learner is right, and it would be as hot as liquid water can exist. If the former, one answer could be current temperature, as there are already some ecosystems collapsing, although it might have more to do with PH than temperature, as both are somehow linked. $\endgroup$ – Camilo Rada Apr 14 at 22:18
  • $\begingroup$ It seems more broad than I intended I would think it can be limited to the photic zone when talking about depth. $\endgroup$ – user15660 Apr 14 at 23:42
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The previous record-holder, P. fumarii, could live at temperatures as high as 113 °C (235 °F), well above the boiling point of water. But the new microbe, for now called “Strain 121,” thrives at 121 °C and can even survive for two hours at 130 °C.

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