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I see this term being used everywhere, but I have not been able to find a formal definition for "ambient aerosols".

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    $\begingroup$ This is a really good question! It's easy to guess that it refers to aerosols in ambient air, but then what's the definition of ambient? Does it mean places where people happen to breathe no matter where they are (Top of Mt. Everest? Space stations?, Deep coal mines?) Or 2 meters off the surface, anywhere on Earth? $\endgroup$ – uhoh May 21 at 4:11
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    $\begingroup$ When I talk about the water content of aerosol particles, I distinguish between dry aerosol particles (water evaporated that was present in ambient air) and ambient aerosol particles (wet particles as in ambient air). Commonly in the atmosphere, water is attached to particles. The amount of water attached to particles depends on the relative humidity (in ambient air) and considerably increases the particle/droplet diameter. Measured/model particle diameters might be given as dry, as wet at XX% rel. humidity or as wet at ambient relative humidity. Maybe it is also used in other contexts. $\endgroup$ – daniel.neumann May 21 at 15:23
  • $\begingroup$ @gansub I second your opinion. $\endgroup$ – Bhoutik Shastri May 24 at 21:38
  • $\begingroup$ @gansub : I posted it as wiki article. Then, it can be freely edited. $\endgroup$ – daniel.neumann May 25 at 19:46
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In the field, in which I work, the term _ambient aerosol` is related to the water content of aerosol particles.

Commonly in the atmosphere, water is attached to particles. The amount of water attached to particles depends on the relative humidity (in ambient air). Increasing relative humidity means more water and, hence, larger particle/droplet diameter. When we provide a measured/modeled particle diameter, we need to note whether the diameter is given as dry, as wet at XX% relative humidity or as wet at ambient relative humidity.

Maybe it is also used in other contexts.

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