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Can someone please help me identify this thing I found inside a rock in the Almanzora riverbed Spainenter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ please add more information and provide better pictures from atleast two sides,and put a scale on the object(in mm or a object of a known size) $\endgroup$ – trond hansen May 21 at 8:59
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry I'm a bit of a technophobe and find it difficult to work these contraptions,it took me 3hrs to post my original picture for instance,I can't find how to edit my post to put on more pictures but will try,scale is shown by the size of my hand I thought ? $\endgroup$ – Steve corney May 22 at 7:43
  • $\begingroup$ The machine won't let me help ! $\endgroup$ – Steve corney May 22 at 8:05
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    $\begingroup$ That's an endocast of a gastropod shell. The original shell dissolved and the object you hold in your hands is the filled inner volume of the shell. Try thinking of baking a cake. You fill the dough in a form, bake the cake and remove the form. The baked cake perfectly shows the form of the cake form you baked it in. The gastropod can't be determined from your picture. Further information and photos would be required for that. $\endgroup$ – JulPal Jun 25 at 18:08
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks guys the natural history museum in the UK tell me it's a gastropod I will take Thier word for it $\endgroup$ – Steve corney Jun 26 at 13:43
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Read below for my initial response which was incorrect. My revision is: It is not an ammonite. It is a gastropod of the genus Cepaea, family Helicidae. I do not know the species, unfortunately.

My initial response, which is incorrect; I've kept it here for future reference: What you found is a small fossilized sea creature known as an ammonite. Ammonite were a squid-like creature that had tenticles and a spiral shell. They existed from the Permian (300 million years ago) up to the end of the Triassic (65 million years ago) and are some of the most common fossils found. The specimen you have resembles the species Simoceras. Simoceras http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/image/44911-simoceras-lytogyroceras-subbeticum/

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure it's an ammonite. It could be just any gastropod. Doesn't even have to be that old. $\endgroup$ – Gimelist Jun 25 at 8:49
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    $\begingroup$ That's no ammonite... Looks like a gastropod to me. Ammonites have quite plain spirals (except aberrant ammonites from the Cretaceous), the object in the picture rather shows a gastropod type of 3d spiralization. $\endgroup$ – JulPal Jun 25 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ I can get behind that argument for sure. I stand corrected and retract my ammonite diagnosis in place of a gastropod. Thanks you two. I'm on board. $\endgroup$ – Rokman Jun 26 at 4:56
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    $\begingroup$ Regarding the spiralization and the calcareous look of the fossil, I'd say that this is no land dwelling gastrod but a marine species. Which features led to your decision to say that it's belonging to Cepaea? Without proper pictures from the side for distinguishing between holostome/siphonostome etc, any diagnosis will be wild guessing. If you want me to do a wild guess: from what I know from excursions and excavations I did in Spain, I'd rather tend to some type of Pleurotomaria indet. $\endgroup$ – JulPal Jun 26 at 6:12

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