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Where does the chloride ions that are required for the salty taste of sea water come from ?

I know that it is the weathering caused by the slightly acidic (due to dissolution of CO2 with water) rain that dissolves minerals in the water which gets carried to ocean. But the sodium ions/atoms require chloride ions/atoms for the salty taste. But I don't think chloride would be present in the rocks.

Please explain.

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According to this site:

Chloride comes from underwater fumaroles (such as black smokers), whose smoke is the exhalation of the vapors that escape from the magma as it rises next to subsurface. There is very little Chloride in magma, less than 1% (of the gaseous content, which is a small fraction of the magma as well), but the massive volume of magma that is output makes up for it. Dissolved anions are also a possibility, albeit a less significant one.

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Chlorine is a very reactive element. Contrary to your statement, chlorine occurs in many rocks and minerals.

The mineral apatite, with the composition: Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH), is a natural source of chlorine. Virtually all rocks contain chlorine.

Chlorine even occurs occurs in alkaline magmas.

One of the most common minerals containing chlorine is common salt, which is sodium chloride, NaCl.

Geologically, chlorine is everywhere. When rocks are exposed to water and acids minerals, including chlorine, dissolve into solution and they are transported to lakes, salt lakes, aquifers and oceans.

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    $\begingroup$ Chlorites do not contain chlorine. They have that name because Greek for green is chloros. $\endgroup$ – Matheus Jun 14 at 11:47

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