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How can I estimate the rainfall rate every ten minutes during a day having the total amount of rainfall during that day ?

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    $\begingroup$ You can't, not as the question is written now. Rainfall patterns depend on climate (location) and time of year, so if you do not specify those the question cannot be answered. $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Jul 16 at 12:37
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    $\begingroup$ If you just need an average, @michael-walsby's answer is correct. However, rain rarely falls steadily for 24 hours. If you need actual dekaminute-to-dekaminute values, you'll need more information. Using hourly weather reports may help you narrow it down a bit, but not to the 10 minute level. $\endgroup$ – Barry Carter Jul 16 at 14:20
  • $\begingroup$ 10 minute rainfall data would be already rather noisy. There is a reason why numerical weather models rarely go beyond hourly accumulation. You could apply data science techniques taking advantage of the 10 minute resolution of automated weather stations being available. Yet there are a lot of open questions you would need to solve on your way. $\endgroup$ – Dmitri Chubarov Jul 18 at 4:16
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Put a cylindrical beaker out in the open at mid day. Remove it at mid day on the following day. Measure the depth of the accumulated rainfall and divide by 24 to give the average rainfall per hour, and divide that by 6 to give the average per 10 mins. In the summer, some of your collected rainwater will be lost through evaporation, so to find that, put your beaker of water outside, but under some sort of roof. Measure the depth when you put it out, and measure it next day when you take it in. That will give an idea of losses due to evaporation, which reckoned in losses every ten minutes would by tiny. If there is not much rain but plenty of hot sunlight, things become tricky, because you will be measuring very tiny quantities. Other than that, you could camp outside and weigh your beaker every 10 minutes, but that's not something I would do myself. The roof I mentioned is only necessary if it is raining, because rain would destroy your figures for evaporation.

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