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I just want see which cities are on the same latitude as others. Please recommend latitude-preserving projection that's free and online.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ It's not really clear what you mean by "Preserves latitude" - arguably all projections show latitude accurately, so long as lines of latitude are drawn on. Mercator makes those lines of latitude parallel and (if north is at the top) horizontal, but they're not equally spaced. Hopefully somebody with a wider knowledge of projections will come along and suggest something which does space latitude equally (or, if no sensible projection can do that, why not!) $\endgroup$ Aug 21, 2019 at 20:53
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs in gis.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$
    – arkaia
    Aug 21, 2019 at 21:26
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    $\begingroup$ @arkaia it would be on-topic at GIS, but I think it is on-topic here as well. Questions can be valid questions on more than one site. $\endgroup$ Aug 21, 2019 at 21:30
  • $\begingroup$ @arkaia I think it's more on topic here than on GIS.SE, since there the focus is almost solely on solving workflow-issues within any GIS. At least the question would be closed for poor research/unclear questioning. $\endgroup$
    – Erik
    Aug 22, 2019 at 6:06
  • $\begingroup$ Asking for a projection that is free makes no sense. Do you mean you want maps that are free to use? $\endgroup$
    – Jan Doggen
    Aug 22, 2019 at 7:47

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enter image description here

A cylindrical projection with a vertically oriented cylinder which is tangent to the Equator produces a map that you are looking for. In this kind of map projection, all the points on the same latitude (all the points that are at the same distance from Equator) stays on the same horizontal line on the projected map.

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Mercator's projection shows lines of latitude accurately in so far as all towns and geographical features at the same latitude will be shown as such by the horizontal lines on a Mercator's projection, but inaccuracy comes in when you look at the distance between lines of latitude as they move away from the equator. The distance between successive lines becomes increasingly extended, which exaggerates the size of northerly countries like Britain and minimises the size of countries on or near the Equator. To look at a Mercator's map, you'd think Borneo, which is on the Equator, was about the same size as Ireland, but it is actually about three times the size of Great Britain. Greenland appears to be as large as Africa, yet it is actually about the size of Algeria. However, all towns and features shown to be at the same latitude are at the same latitude, which is what you say you are looking for..

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  • $\begingroup$ This is all true, but not what OP was asking about. $\endgroup$
    – Spencer
    Aug 25, 2019 at 18:41
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The cyllindrical Mercator projection, or the Web Mercator Projection, as used by Google Maps (which uses projection EPSG:3857), OpenStreetMaps and may other projects - all these preserve latitude. So if you will browse most of the online maps, you will see the latitude preserved :-)

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