2
$\begingroup$

Euler's "fixed point" theorem ... can be stated as:

The most general displacement of a rigid body over the surface of a sphere can be regarded as a rotation about a suitable axis which passes through the centre of that sphere.

Thus all plate motions can be described by a rotation axis, which passes through the centre of the Earth and cuts the surface at two points, called the poles of rotation. The relative motion of two plates then needs a pole of rotation and an angular velocity to be defined.

So where are those poles located? Is there any map or resource indicating where those are 'poles' are?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The question of where are the Oiler poles are right now is not of particular interest.

I find it curious that the one for the North American plate lies roughly close to the famous "Muertes Archipelago" ;-)

$\endgroup$
-1
$\begingroup$

When a tectonic plate moves across the surface of the mantle, it's movement could be described as a rotation, owing to the fact that the mantle is a sphere, making it impossible for any point on the Earth's surface to move in a straight line. If you take the centre of the plate as one pole and draw a line from it through the centre of the Earth, the point where it exits the crust on the opposite side of the globe is the other pole. What use this knowledge is to anyone, or how it helps our understanding of plate tectonics, is very hard to see.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.