0
$\begingroup$

Haze is not considered to be a cloud or mist, and it also is not fog.

What is the ultimate reason that haze and general poor visibility ranges prevail in stable atmospheric conditions?

Is the cause concentration of pollutants, some other effect caused by the presence of moisture/humidity, a combination of both, or something else completely?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Haze can have a number of causes. Sometimes it is due to moisture in the atmosphere, but not sufficient to form clouds, and sometimes it is due to pollution. In Britain it can on rare occasions be caused by dust picked up from the Sahara desert and carried northwards. As you suggest, it can sometimes be due to a combination of causes. In heavily polluted London, many years ago, the lunchtime winter sun was so reddened with pollution haze that I was easily able to see sunspots with the naked eye. These were special circumstances, and I wouldn't advise anyone to try it nowadays.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Haze consists mostly of aerosols. To which extent varies on the location and conditions.

Aerosols are for example dust, pollen, particulate matter, ash (or other pollutants due to combustion) and... a lot of other stuff. Basically, anything which is ligthly enough to float in the air and small enough to mostly not be seen by the naked eye (dust/sand are an exception).

Aerosols function as condensation cores for water vapor - so if there is rather dry air and no rain, no aerosols are "washed" from the atmosphere and haze builds up. In special weather conditions (inversions aka next to no wind and no convection) the haze becomes very thick and a health hazard (e.g. Victorian London, today Delhi or Beijing or Stuttgart).

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.