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Pieter Tans 2019-10-07
(lead scientist of NOAA's Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network):

Based on the best historical data that we have available CO2 is probably increasing at a rate at of least 100 times faster than at any time in the last 800,000 years.

I want to make sure that this is an accurate statement.
Have there been any faster changes over a similar timespan in the history of life?

Does science validate this statement: "It is virtually certain that there are no natural processes that could plausibly account for an average annual CO2 increase of 1.42 PPM lasting 70 years (1950 to present) at any time in the last 40 million years"

Here is the 40 million year data graph
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/cms/attachment/1821253f-a0d4-48a5-a7a2-417797ca775e/rsta20130096f05.jpg

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ it had been better to post data from human history and earth history(your data have a too short timespan) $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 6 at 5:40
  • $\begingroup$ @trondhansen The linked data that I posted spans 400,000 years. I posted the fastest rate of CO2 increase for that whole 400,000 year period. $\endgroup$ – polcott Oct 6 at 5:56
  • $\begingroup$ You are doubtful about a statement by a NOAA lead scientist in their area of expertise, and you are trying to check it by asking on StackExchange? $\endgroup$ – Semidiurnal Simon Oct 8 at 17:10
  • $\begingroup$ @SemidiurnalSimon I am not doubtful at all. He precisely agreed with my own analysis. I want to build the strongest factual case possible against anyone that would deny the above analysis. Here is my hypothesis: "It is virtually certain that there are no natural processes that could plausibly account for the two orders of magnitude faster rate of CO2 increase at any time in the last 40 million years" $\endgroup$ – polcott Oct 8 at 17:56

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