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Alert, in Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada, is northernmost permanently inhabited place in world.

The site was first visited by Sir George Nares, who commanded HMS Alert in 1875-76, the first vessel to land on the shores of northern Ellesmere Island.

Is Alert a harbor/port? (I've read a few papers about Alert, but I haven't found the answer.)

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    $\begingroup$ In what sense do you mean port/harbor? It's a seaside town on an island with a population of 62. Are you asking does it receive supplies by ship, for which it would need minimal port infrastructure, or are you asking does it have more significant port facilities? $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    Jul 5 '20 at 9:44
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    $\begingroup$ i do not think there is any permanent installations for loading or unloading a ship,it can probably be sea ice all year for multiple years in a row in this location. $\endgroup$ Jul 5 '20 at 11:27
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    $\begingroup$ Nope. But there's an airstrip. google.com/maps/@82.4970497,-62.3044558,3264m/data=!3m1!1e3. I don't know how much of the year it's accessible by ship, but that's probably going to change anyway ;-/. Btw., nice glacier shaped landscape :-) $\endgroup$
    – user20217
    Jul 5 '20 at 12:16
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Wikipedia does not include Alert as a port. As the comments suggest, there is too much sea ice at that latitude to merit the infrastructure required of a port. The northernmost port in the world is identified here as Dikson, Russia, at 73°30' N.

Supplies to Alert are delivered by air; the settlement does include an air port.

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    $\begingroup$ The proper name of Dikson is Dikson. I would consider either Longyearbyen 78°13' N or Pyramiden 78°39' N/Ny-Ålesund 78°55' N (unclear whether they are still in use as ports) to be the northernmost port. $\endgroup$
    – klanomath
    Jul 5 '20 at 21:19
  • $\begingroup$ Correct tedvthe first part. Added a clarification for the second point. Could you exchange this comment for an updated version? $\endgroup$ Jul 5 '20 at 21:23
  • $\begingroup$ I speculate that they might have a mooring facility, some sort of fastening buoy anchored to the sea floor, for big ships to deliver the bulk stuff when conditions allow. Unfortunately the place is outside of the range of general nautical charts (e.g. navionics.com chart viewer). For comparison: Salvagem Grande nature reserve, the black thingy is a mooring buoy: webapp.navionics.com/?lang=en#boating@13&key=ob%7DvDnl%7B_B $\endgroup$
    – user20217
    Jul 6 '20 at 6:42

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