1
$\begingroup$

Does the Earth exhibit measurable gravity waves? Note: I'm not asking about gravitational waves.

Some recent experiments looking at low-frequency (3$\times 10^{-5}$Hz) accelerometer data are showing some features that might be explained by this. The signal that I and others have measured shows a signal at least 10 to 15 dB above the noise floor that appears to change somewhat based on local geology as determined between measurements in Japan, Hawaii, and the continental US.

Any insight into crustal gravity waves with a period of roughly 9 hours, or other phenomena that might result in reproducible signals like this in accelerometers is appreciated.

Any suggestions for further analysis that might differentiate among different possible explanations is also welcome!

$\endgroup$
11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is this a legitimate question or is it self promotion & possible advertising? $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    May 9 at 10:43
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because it is about self promotion & advertising. $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    May 9 at 11:50
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ You're asking for an opinion. Anyway a peer reviwed paper or one in regular pre-print would probably be a better base. $\endgroup$
    – user22279
    May 9 at 17:11
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Sparks Earth Science is not totally of Geologists with Geology Majors, go to the help page and read the guidelines, no Self-Promotion, advertising allowed, also no opinions allowed only fact-based Questions and Answers. $\endgroup$
    – MooseSmart
    May 14 at 15:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @uhoh: you have completely changed the question's meaning, probably not even read the work whose link you deleted. Given the tantrum you threw when I interpreted your questions concerning the flares of SpaceX satellites (I didn't even edit your question) this is right away bizarre. Don't change questions to your liking, post a new one. Or answer it if you think you can. It would be interesting to ask if and how seismic evenets can trigger gravity not gravitational waves. $\endgroup$
    – user22279
    May 16 at 13:17
2
$\begingroup$

Edit: This answer refers to the first version of this question which asked about "gravitational waves".

Typically, the term "gravitational wave" is reserved for distortions ("strain") in spacetime, in accordance with General Relativity. Gravitational waves are a property of spacetime and can thus propagate in empty space. In contrast, what you measure here are simply seismic waves, such as pressure waves propagating through Earth and your setup. In fact, seismic waves are the limiting noise that prevents gravitational wave detectors such as aLIGO to measure at lower frequencies, see e.g. this paper for a discussion and plots.

$\endgroup$
5
  • $\begingroup$ We do have seismic signals in some of our measurements, but all of our measurements include a signal at around 3E-5 Hz that is 20 dB above the noise floor. This is a static signal that shows up in every measurement including those from the Continental US, Japan and Hawaii. By your reasoning, seismic events are occuring at the exact same frequency at different times and different places...that would be quite the global seismic event, highly unlikely. The theoretical section first printed on 07/2020 predicts a large signal at this frequency before measurements were made in 11/2021. $\endgroup$
    – Sparks
    May 10 at 0:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I'm not a Earth Scientist but there are modes where the entire Earth oscillates at. You could get closer to the actual cause of your signal by not only comparing amplitudes, but also the phases. (In any case don't get your hopes up, it's most certainly not gravitational waves) $\endgroup$
    – rfl
    May 10 at 0:58
  • $\begingroup$ The gravitational waves detected by LIGO are the result of two pulsars rapidly moving around a common center. The original theory of gravitational waves from General Relativity was rejected by Physical Review journal because it lacked a plausible mechanism for generating waves from the static or moving GR solutions. The binary pulsars each generate static waves through this new matter-wave model and the Doppler shifted version of those static waves from each pulsar intermodulate and produce base band frequencies that LIGO measures. $\endgroup$
    – Sparks
    May 10 at 1:53
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I am sure we could get better readings if we divert the warp energy to the lateral sensor phalanx ... ? $\endgroup$
    – user22279
    May 10 at 8:46
  • $\begingroup$ There was a helpful edit to the question which I'd accepted, then I'd made a further edit. I don't think either impacts your already-posted answer negatively, but please have a look. I think the question can be reopened, there's no longer any need for it to be closed hopefully. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 15 at 22:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.