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My understanding is that with the relatively recent discovery of many more volcanoes on the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge (and perhaps other ocean ridges) and more deep trenches with thermal vents, that the estimates of the total thermal energy transfer (e.g., in Joules per year) into the oceans have increased significantly, to the point where this heat may need to be factored into climate models, (though still small), for future estimates of ocean temperatures.

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    $\begingroup$ "the relatively recent discovery of many more volcanoes on the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge (and perhaps other ocean ridges) and more deep trenches with thermal vents" "the estimates of the total thermal energy transfer (e.g., in Joules per year) into the oceans have increased significantly" Some references would be good. Also, clarify what is your Question. $\endgroup$ – Keith McClary Jun 8 at 19:51
  • $\begingroup$ Suppose scientists' estimates of the Earth's internal heat budget are low by a factor of three. This is highly, highly unlikely. Even if that was the case, the Earth's internal heat budget would would be less than a tenth of one percent of the Earth's total heat budget. That remains in the noise level. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Jun 9 at 10:28

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