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A certain land (urban area, forest etc.) is under water for a certain period. How can we distinguish that the area is flooded or waterlogged? What are the criteria?

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Waterlogging is a situation were soil is either fully or near saturated most of the time, the air phase is restricted and aerobic conditions prevail. Waterlogged soil may appear dry on the surface. The soil does not need to be submerged to be waterlogged.

Flooding is a temporary submersion of land by water. The duration of a flood may be very short, such as hours, or it may prolonged, such a weeks or months in flatter regions with poor drainage. Eventually flood waters recede and the soil may eventually dry out.

A flash flood is a very rapid flooding of low lying areas or dry waterways usually associated with sudden heavy rainfall or melt water from ice or snow.

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  • $\begingroup$ So, if the water is submerged, we will call it flood and the waterlogging condition may not be visible in bare eyes. You said the soil does not need to be submerged to be waterlogged. If it is submerged then will it become flooded? Is it possible that flooding and waterlogging can occur simultaneously? $\endgroup$ Jun 29 at 4:09
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, that's what happens to soil under a lake. $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    Jun 29 at 4:29
  • $\begingroup$ More to my previous comment, after a thought accorded to me, soil can also be waterlogged and flooded simultaneously during a prolonged flood that can last for at least a number of weeks. $\endgroup$
    – Fred
    Jun 29 at 15:12

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