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I posted this before on physics stack exchange, but it was deemed off topic, which is understandable, so I hope it won't be here.

Recently, I stumbled upon an article by an individual named A.M. Tyurin, which challenges carbondating:

https://web.archive.org/web/20200218162343/http://new.chronologia.org/volume2/turin2.html

It is in Russian, so here are some of the conclusions in English, on which I'd like to get a comment on:

  1. In the method of radiocarbon dating there is a clearly undefined assumption - the absolute content of 13C and 12C in the atmosphere is stable over the entire interval of using radiocarbon dating. This is the main secret of the radiocarbon community.
  1. The Delta 14C plot and its derivative - the calibration curve of radiocarbon dating, reflect the variations in 14C not in the atmosphere, but in the CO2 atmosphere. This is the main lie of the radiocarbon community
  1. The system errors are "inscribed" into the calibration curve: dating by the Libby method (they were included in the calibration curve through dendrochronological scales built taking into account the dating by the Libby method); incorrect manipulations with the values ​​of the Delta 14C graph (manipulations were performed in order to "take into account" the influence of anthropogenic factors on the change in the CO2 content in the atmosphere); associated with variations of 13C in the CO2 atmosphere. There are also systemic errors in the estimates of the contribution of the shape of the calibration curve to the dating accuracy. This is the great mystery of the calibration curve.

I am interested in seeing a comment on these claims and maybe on the wider context of the article as well, if possible.

I hope my question is clear enough, thanks.

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  • $\begingroup$ easy tip, Joe Blows unpublished blog articles ranting about corporate conspiracies and cover ups run through google translate, probably not a good source of information. especially from one that was redacted. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Oct 12 '21 at 21:08

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