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I know there is a mainstream answer that thinks the rainbow sand dunes they be explained geologically... I just want to know if it's possible to form those colors and those dunes from mining? And if not why do they look exactly like the mine dumps in South America?

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    $\begingroup$ do you have a picture/website of the mine dumps in South America that you speak of? $\endgroup$ Feb 14, 2023 at 3:14
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    $\begingroup$ The site you link to mentions rainbow-colored mountains, but apparently not dunes? Which picture are you talking about? $\endgroup$
    – Spencer
    Feb 14, 2023 at 19:11

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No, not possible.

According to a report by the United States Geological Survey, the rocks in and around "Artist's Palette", which is the place you are describing, are various volcanic rocks: basalts, tuffs, andesites, etc. The colours results from various degrees of weathering. They are stratigraphically consistent just like you would expect from natural rocks, and different to mine dumps. One example from the report:

Unit Ta4A forms the top unit in the "Artist Palette sequence", occurring at Artist Palette and north to Desolation Canyon.

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The unit consists mostly of basalt with less abundant andesite and minor tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. These rocks are conspicuously exposed where Artist Drive follows a narrow canyon through the ridge underlain by this unit 1.2 mi (2.0 km) northwest of Artist Palette. The basalt is in part solid but agglomerate, cinder agglutinate, and conglomerate of basalt clasts are also common. Most is dark-gray but color varies to reddish-brown in fresh rocks and greenish-gray in altered ones. Most contains sparse plagioclase microphenocrysts. Andesite is dark-brownish-gray, aphyric and platy-weathering. Interlayered tuffaceous sedimentary rocks are light-gray to pinkish; some contain rhyolite fragments.

In other words, nothing special. Just a regular sequence of ancient volcanic rocks.

I am not sure which mining dumps you are referring to, but green colours are often associated with copper which is often mined in South America. There is no copper in Death Valley and in the rocks you are asking about. The reason for the green colour is different and unrelated to copper.

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