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I want to simulate evaporation processes from water to air using Henry's law. I want to use an established Henry coefficient.

I prefer to use a Henry coefficient that depends on temperature. Nevertheless, I can start with a constant Henry coefficient. I looked up various sources but they only state Henry coefficients for single gases like O2 or CO2. I could not find laws to describe the temperature coefficient for air, even in larger publications like:

  • IAPWS / NIST: DOI 10.1063/1.1564818
  • henrys-law.org / R. Sander: DOI 10.5194/acp-23-10901-2023

Is there an easy way to compose the Henry coefficient for air and water out of air's components? Are there other publications for laws to get the Henry coefficient for air and water?

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You should, ideally (no pun intended), be able to use the existing Henry Coefficient data you have access to and a list of partial pressures for the atmosphere you want to model. That will give you a weighted average that is probably not completely accurate but should be within a few percent and good enough for most calculation purposes.

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