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enter image description here

Can anyone help me identifying this rock and describing it? Saw this today while driving.

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closed as off-topic by Jan Doggen, user12525, Gimelist, Peter Jansson, Fred Aug 26 at 17:35

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about rock identification requests are off-topic. For more information, see the announcement on meta." – Jan Doggen, Community, Gimelist, Peter Jansson, Fred
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Earth Science Stack Exchange. Please see our guidelines on rock identification requests and add the necessary information to this post. $\endgroup$ – casey Nov 9 '15 at 2:32
  • $\begingroup$ Not enough information, from how compressed it is, my guess is that it could be Greywacke $\endgroup$ – user5099 Jan 5 '16 at 21:49
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Sorry, but there just isn't enough detail in this photo, There are dozens of possibilities. A close up photo of a freshly-fractured unweathered surface would help. That's why geologists carry hammers and a hand lens. Even a good photo isn't necessarily diagnostic. The standard approach is to cut a thin section and analyze it under a polarizing microscope. Even experienced geologists can't always identify a rock just from looking at a hand specimen or field exposure.

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    $\begingroup$ This would have been more useful to the OP as a comment. $\endgroup$ – kwinkunks Nov 9 '15 at 19:04
  • $\begingroup$ OK, you have editorial control, so cut the answer and paste as a comment. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Stanger Nov 10 '15 at 14:00
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This looks like shale, A type of rock formed by sediment layering of Ash and clay. But could be slate a metamorphic reworking of shale. The only way to tell is chemical composition of this rock but a simple test is to hit it with a hammer. If it breaks easily into brittle pieces than it is shale if it is hard to break, meaning you need to apply a lot of force, and breaks into smaller version of the bigger rock than it is slate. Hope this helps The left picture is shale and the right picture is slate. shale slate

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