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Would anyone know of references (available online or not) that give detailed explanations and especially the physics behind violent meteorological events such as hurricanes?

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  • $\begingroup$ Suggest searches at journals.ametsoc.org on topics of interest. A pain to slog through for the useful ones at times, but a reasonable site. To get access to all articles, I believe you'd need an AMS membership :-/ $\endgroup$ – JeopardyTempest Sep 16 '17 at 23:02
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There are many generalized references, such as http://moe.met.fsu.edu/~rhart/papers-hart/2006Hart.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_cyclone
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/tcfaqD.html
But I think the best is Kerry Emmanuel's presentation: http://www3.nd.edu/~its/Emanuel.pdf
Is this sufficient detail for you? If not, then you probably need to do a course in tropical meteorology.

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  • $\begingroup$ Have you similar references about the Coriolis acceleration affecting hurricanes? $\endgroup$ – tinyyy Nov 16 '15 at 18:12
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    $\begingroup$ I don't know of any particularly scholarly articles about this, but there is basically no mystery about the Coriolis effect. It is merely an application of 'conservation of angular momentum'. The more poleward a mass of air moves from the equator, the less angular momentum it has around the Earth's spin axis, and hence there is a corresponding gain of angular momentum around the storm axis. A hurricane has to have a certain amount of spin from this source to kick-start the process but, once started, most of the energy gain is from latent heat from the warm sea surface, not from the Coriolis. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Stanger Nov 17 '15 at 19:50

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