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I saw some indexes about environmental quality in many websites, like in:

http://www.numbeo.com/pollution/rankings_by_country.jsp

I wonder why the environmental quality index is higher in USA and in Europe than in other sub-Saharan or Latin American countries.

We know that approximately 1/3 of the world total pollution is coming from USA and Europe.

It seems to me a little bit strange. Are there any features about the circulation of CO2 on atmosphere that could explain this fact? Or are there just economic reasons that concern development levels of countries?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Jan Doggen, Fred, Gimelist, arkaia, farrenthorpe Jan 24 '16 at 18:02

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ You have to break down your data. approximately 1/3 of the world total pollution does not say much. What kind of pollution? There is really not much so say about such a broad question. That includes backing up the statements approximately 1/3 of the world total pollution is coming from USA and Europe and USA is the second most polluting country. Please add links. $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Jan 20 '16 at 12:05
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    $\begingroup$ Also, your question is very badly written. some indexes: yet you mention only one. the environmental quality index: what kind of index is that? Questions on StackExchange need to be self-contained. The way it is formulated now is "There is something over there, can you explain why?" Please edit all essential information into your question. $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Jan 20 '16 at 12:07
  • $\begingroup$ @JanDoggen You will see the index if you look on the link... $\endgroup$ – optimal control Feb 4 '16 at 17:43
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The website you cited has this explanation:

Most of our data are based on perceptions (opinions) from visitors of this website. For pollution section, we include some relevant data from World Health Organization and other institutions if we find it helpful.

So basically that index is based on people's perception, and CO2 pollution (which your "1/3 of the world total pollution" is probably based on) is not something that people can see or smell, it's problematic because of indirect effects.

The USA and Europe have pretty strict regulation to reduce the more perceptible components of vehicle and industry exhausts, like soot, sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides. Their cities also often have good public transportation and zoning laws that separate industry and residential areas.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't agree with your statement that cities in the USA often have good public transportation. $\endgroup$ – gerrit Jan 20 '16 at 14:13
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    $\begingroup$ @gerrit: Compared to what, though? Also, if it's a matter of perceptions, urban areas are sort of irrelevant, as many of the perceptions could very well be based on parks, wilderness areas, and so on, and the US does do pretty well on that. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Jan 22 '16 at 20:48

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