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(Edited). Biotic pump theory (2006): Forests cause enhanced transpiration and precipitation and create areas of low pressure that suck in more moisture in a positive feedback loop.

A few years ago an international team found the mechanism for enhanced precipitation. They found that fungi release potassium salts late at night, as they release spores, and that plants release turpenes and isoprenes in the morning and these sublime onto the salt in the sunlight to form extremely good condensation nuclei. Source: Biogenic Potassium Salt Particles as Seeds for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Amazon

I made a video about this.
The second part, from about 7 minutes into the video, clearly shows cumulonimbus clouds forming at approximately 3 to 4 pm over forested areas of Cuba, Florida and Mexico. This is consistent with the biotic pump theory.

The biotic pump theory is that enhanced transpiration and precipitation over forested areas causes low pressure areas and attracts wind (laden with moisture) from elsewhere.

To create a low pressure area, the clouds have to remove some gas from the area, and they do so by transporting air up into the next layer of the atmosphere. The "tail" of the hurricane (the stream of wind delivered to the upper atmosphere by the hurricane actually demonstrates that this is happening.

When its tail passes over those areas, its moisture condenses on the condensation nuclei that have passed up through the cloud with the dry air into that higher layer of the atmosphere. The main problem that the biotic pump theory has is that it was proposed by nuclear physicists. They suggest that several of the "assumptions" on which meteorology are based violate the laws of thermodynamics. Coming from mere nuclear physicists, this should give people pause for thought. But the biggest problem has been a communication problem. The meteorological community have found the mathematics they use almost incomprehensible.

How do you read the evidence?

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    $\begingroup$ Please 1) Make your text less of a wall of text 2) Give full disclosure. What video (who) is that? 3) Any relation to the other video youtube.com/watch?v=KZ_UQvnIxSM or to other theories? 4) Can you elaborate on your statement In 2006 the bulk of the meteorological community rejected the "biotic pump theory" which explains with real physics why the amazon rainforest has so much rain under the link you give? $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Feb 21 '16 at 11:41
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not a site for personal theories. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Feb 21 '16 at 22:30
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    $\begingroup$ @DavidHammen, come on -- we're not elitist here, suggesting that only someone with the formal qualification of a title or degree is worthy of hearing their theories. As scientists, we should consider ideas without regard to who brings it forward. I'm not saying that the theory brought forward here makes any sense at all (it's outside my range of expertise), but that whether Brian White has a degree or not should not make a shred of a difference in our answers. $\endgroup$ – Wolfgang Bangerth Feb 21 '16 at 23:29
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    $\begingroup$ I edited the question. Note that the biotic pump theory was not proposed by laymen. It was proposed by 2 nuclear physicists. It was proposed about 6 years before the process for condensation nuclei production in rain-forests was known. Please leave the question open, because arguing it will help people (including elitists) refine their understanding of physical processes. A little humility never hurt anybody. If a theory explains the physical world better than the old theory, shouldn't there be a smooth transition to the new theory? $\endgroup$ – Brian White Feb 22 '16 at 8:22
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    $\begingroup$ @BrianWhite Seeding isn't a binary situation, i.e., no forest != no seeding. There are CCN everywhere, both advected and produced locally, even in semi-arid and arid regions. The point is that forests are also a source of CCN, so they supplement the background levels and can enhance the frequency/intensity of rainfall. The net climate effect is that this could help sustain forest further into continental interiors. Estimating the strength of that enhancement is a perfectly good research topic. $\endgroup$ – Deditos Feb 25 '16 at 9:23

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