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I saw this line today in a NWS weather alert:

  • ACCUMULATIONS...A FEW HUNDREDS OF ICE ACCRETION.

Is this standard terminology? Does "hundreds (of)" somehow refer to a unit of measure, or is there a (likely or standard) unit of measure implied or missing here?

http://alerts.weather.gov/cap/wwacapget.php?x=MA1255EAFEBC38.WinterWeatherAdvisory.1255EB001010MA.BOXWSWBOX.18aa678bad1893fa8f6667c193e56ef4

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I think that it's referring to hundredths of an inch, and "hundreds" is a typo for "hundredths". This FAA information sheet says:

All ice accretion amounts will be reported to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). An example of a 1, 3, 6-hour ice accretion remark would be: “I1010 I3015 I6022.” This translates to 0.10 inches of ice in the last hour, 0.15 inches of ice in the last 3 hours, and 0.22 inches of ice in the last 6 hours.

This also matches the terminology used in some other weather reports, such as this one:

Ice accretion was light, generally only a few hundredths of an inch...

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