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If you were swimming/floating within a body of water experiencing upwelling due to sea-surface thermal fronts, would you be able to physically feel the water that is being up-welled or is it on a different scale not sensed by humans?

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  • $\begingroup$ Definitely yes! The temperature difference can be 5 degrees C in some cases $\endgroup$ – arkaia Jul 16 '16 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting. I meant more in terms of physically feeling the water-upwelling along a front, rather than sensing temperature differences between 2 water bodies. $\endgroup$ – G. Gip Jul 17 '16 at 18:26
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    $\begingroup$ The upwelling velocities are tiny in general. You will not feel them. There are only a few upward motions in the ocean that can be felt like a tidal bore: staff.civil.uq.edu.au/h.chanson/mascaret.html $\endgroup$ – arkaia Jul 18 '16 at 8:42
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There is a sea-surface thermal front at the northwest tip of Scotland. On the western side is water from the Gulf Stream Drift - cool, but sufficiently comfortable to swim in. On the north side is Arctic water which is horribly cold and which nobody in their right mind would swim in. I write from personal experience!

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    $\begingroup$ Interesting. I guess i meant more in terms of physically sensing the movement of water, rather than the temperature difference between the 2 bodies. If you were around the thermal boundary in NW Scotland, would you be able to feel a current of water upwelling to the surface? $\endgroup$ – G. Gip Jul 17 '16 at 18:25

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