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Earths' crust is usually not exposed. Above-water portion is covered with soil, and Underwater portions are covered with various deposits or sediments. Oceans contain Pelagic sediments.(I don't know whether this underwater sediment considered as soil or not).

The soft cover is probably not being considered as Crust. Some sources telling it pedosphere (soil-sphere), but with pictures of only terrestrial soil.

But it is not clear to me : exact how-much portion is being called pedosphere? Is it the whole skin of Earth (including underwater-depositions)? If not; then

  1. what is the correct term for the complete soft-layer on Earth?

  2. Is there any term for part-of skin-of-Earth which is beneath water?

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what is the correct term for the complete soft-layer on Earth?

Sediments.

Is there any term for part-of skin-of-Earth which is beneath water?

Marine sediments.

The soft cover is probably not being considered as Crust

It is definitely part of the crust. When discussing mantle-crust issues, then crust is usually in the context of crystalline rocks, but it depends on context.

But it is not clear to me : exact how-much portion is being called pedosphere? Is it the whole skin of Earth (including underwater-depositions)?

Pedosphere refers to terrestrial soil and sediments, and it usually discussed in context with other "spheres" such as atmosphere and lithosphere. Sediments (and marine sediments) is a neutral term.

As always, in Earth Sciences, there are several terms for the same thing. There is no "correct" term, just "better" when discussing said thing in various circles.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for informing that the soil and all-other sediments are considered belong to crust. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Aug 10 '16 at 10:51
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A term more inclusive by not being focused on soil forming processes might be Regolith. The originial definition according to the source you find on the Wiki page:

In places this covering is made up of material originating through rock-weathering or plant growth in situ. In other instances it is of fragmental and more or less decomposed matter drifted by wind, water or ice from other sources. This entire mantle of unconsolidated material, whatever its nature or origin, it is proposed to call the regolith.

As Michael points out Earth Sciences disciplines come up with definitions according to their needs, in the German Wikipedia you can find a list of definitions of earths spheres , many of them overlapping.

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    $\begingroup$ afaik regolith only includes terrestrial material $\endgroup$ – Gimelist Aug 10 '16 at 10:08
  • $\begingroup$ With google translate I 've read that page but could not found the any-such term. However thanks for informing about regolith $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Aug 10 '16 at 10:50

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