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I am a Ph.D student in Computer Science and Statistical Genetics. I recently became very interested in climate change, for obvious reasons. I would like to use my solid scientific and statistical background in order to get a good grasp of the models that climate scientists use to generate the dire predictions of global warming, which quickly seem to become reality, and to understand the possible outcomes and their probabilities.

Is there a good reference or review, book or paper(s), that could provide a clear, thorough introduction to the field for people like me, who have no background in climate studies but are interested in the technical details?

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EnergyNumbers suggestion is good, but you can only go so far in reading about it second hand. I suggest that you pick a grid cell of interest, then go to the World Bank's climate change knowledge portal.

Climate Change Knowledge Portal

This gives a good cross section of 16 CMIP-5 AOGCM outputs. Check out the variation, and accuracy of the hindcasts vs evidence-based field instrumental data for the same location. Then you will get a good feel for the strengths and weaknesses of the modelling. Also, remember that water-related parameters are much less accurate to forecast than temperature-related parameters.

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If you're interested in in the cause of climate change from a scientific perspective and how the climate system science have evolved I highly recommend The Warming Papers by David Archer and Raymond Pierrehumbert. It is a commented compendium of classic scientific papers forming the basis of the science of climate change and anthropogenic global warming.

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You may also want to consider alternative viewpoints, from less politically engaged scientists. These might not be "reviews", but a lot of to think about.

(1) Testimony of MIT Professor Richard S. Lindzen, the testimony before Senate, 2001,

(2) Dr. John R. Christy, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Satellite measurements, his Testimony before US Senate in 2015.

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