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We searched for cinnabarit in an abandoned mine (Google Maps, in Békásmegyer, Hungary). We collected these samples, but as we are not geologists, we are not sure what we found. Pictures about the samples: picture 1 picture 2

Did we succeed, is this indeed cinnabarit?

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Did we succeed, is this indeed cinnabarit?

Probably yes. Cinnabar has a very distinct brick-red colour, and some of your samples definitely have it. I'm not certain how much of this is actually cinnabar and how much is other stuff, but there is enough cinnabar in there to make it obvious just from the picture.

IMPORTANT

Cinnabar is toxic. It will release mercury metal on oxidation (that is, exposure to air), on exposure to water (so don't throw it in the river), and on exposure to strong light (that is, sunlight). On heating it will release mercury vapour. People die because of this.

Go to the mine, and put it back in there, never taking it back. In case you do want to keep one of them, make sure it is clearly labelled as TOXIC and DANGEROUS and POISON in both English and Hungarian, and keep it away from children and pets.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, it is indeed dangerous, but if you really want it in your collection, other alternatives are to keep a sample inside a hermetically sealed glass box, or encase the sample in a block of transparent resin. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Stanger Aug 25 '16 at 0:15

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