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What are some good textbooks and online resources for learning about geophysics? That is, physics, as it relates to the earth's geology, shape, and internal structure.

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closed as too broad by EnergyNumbers, foobarbecue, Peter Jansson, Brian Rushton, casey Apr 16 '14 at 14:45

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This strikes me as a "shopping list question" - perhaps not a good precedent to set on a new site. (see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/158809/…) $\endgroup$ – Semidiurnal Simon Apr 16 '14 at 8:53
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    $\begingroup$ I disagree I think this question is good for a new site on the topic, and here is a precedent from another stackexchange site: math.stackexchange.com/questions/275/… $\endgroup$ – Kenshin Apr 16 '14 at 10:47
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    $\begingroup$ That question is much more specific (for non-mathematicians). I like these kind of questions (Stats.SE has a few good ones), but I think you need to narrow it down to a more specific field (e.g. physical oceanography), or a specific type of resource (e.g. pop-science walk-through books). $\endgroup$ – naught101 Apr 17 '14 at 2:39
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    $\begingroup$ Or maybe the term geophysics is more specific than I thought... $\endgroup$ – naught101 Apr 17 '14 at 2:40
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    $\begingroup$ @naught101: I appended a "definition" to geophysics in order to make the term as specific as possible, and voted to open the question in its current form. $\endgroup$ – Tom Au Apr 21 '14 at 15:16
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I also strongly suggest the courses available on the coursera platform under the category "Energy & Earth Sciences" here.

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There are two universally loved geophysics texts : Turcotte and Shubert and Stein and Wyessesion. Both are upper division/lower graduate level texts. Fowler is great if you do not have a strong mathematical background (multivariate calculus). Beyond that, it might be difficult to get a a good understanding without an Introductory physics course, and a few semesters of calculus. A good way to learn about geophysics, is in fact, just learning about physics and mathematics in general. Hopefully this stack exchange will also become a good resource.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 for Fowler. As well as geodynamics, geophysics can also include exploration geophysics, where it seemed each sub-discipline had its own book. $\endgroup$ – winwaed Apr 16 '14 at 12:57
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Geophysics has many flavors to it. Prof Claerbout's site has a lot of free stuff which are a good introduction to one part of it.

http://sepwww.stanford.edu/sep/prof/

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