1
$\begingroup$

There is Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) and British Summer Time (BST). One is used in the United Kingdom (UK) in the winter, and the other in summer. Is there a three letter abbreviation for the time zone which means current UK time regardless of time of the year?

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by arkaia, kingledion, hichris123 Dec 21 '16 at 20:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about earth science, within the scope defined in the help center." – arkaia, kingledion, hichris123
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This might get a better response at English Language Learners Stack Exchange: ell.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$ – Spencer Dec 21 '16 at 16:00
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Spencer I don't believe it would be on-topic at ELL. $\endgroup$ – hichris123 Dec 21 '16 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ It probably isn't on-topic anywhere, but the answer is No, there is no such three-letter abbreviation, much like CST/CDT, PST/PDT EST/EDT, CET/CEST and similar designations. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Leach Dec 21 '16 at 20:52
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Perhaps the question could be edited to be more clear... but this question is about time zones, which is on topic. The difference of GMT (no daylight savings) and British Summer Time (with Daylight savings) is worth answering on this site. $\endgroup$ – farrenthorpe Dec 22 '16 at 8:21
  • $\begingroup$ Closest I think we use is ET to refer to Eastern Time regardless of season in situations such as on television programming times. But without multi-time zone programs over there, I never heard a similar term there. Perhaps "British time" would be the fairest guess? And while this doesn't fall under any of the sciences listed in the help, since there's no geography (yet), this seems a fair place to get an answer. $\endgroup$ – JeopardyTempest Dec 22 '16 at 16:02

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.