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enter image description here

Hello, my friend has this solid white rock, can you tell me about it, thanks all.

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closed as off-topic by user12525, Peter Jansson, arkaia, Ash, Jan Doggen Jul 11 at 7:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Please review our rock identification guidelines to provide the missing information so that your question is both answerable and useful to new users." – Community, Peter Jansson, arkaia, Ash, Jan Doggen
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to earthscience.SE. Take a look at this guide for asking rock identification questions. At the moment your question is very difficult to answer. $\endgroup$ – bon Feb 7 '17 at 8:40
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It is sedimentary rock which is most likely composed of one or more of the following minerals:

  • calcite

  • quartz - chalcedony

  • gypsum
  • barite
  • halite

For a more complete identification, you would need to provide:

  • an estimate of mineral hardness, can the rock scratch a steel knife blade

  • an estimate of mineral density - Compare weight to a similar sized rock composed of quartz. Getting an estimate of density can be a challenge with larger rocks.

  • acid test, if whether the rock reacts to HCL
  • Description and/or image of any crystalline texture the rock might have.
  • Is the rock friable (breaks by the pressure of your hand) gypsum is a soft mineral and gypsum rock is often friable.
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  • $\begingroup$ Could also be halite. But if I were to have a guess, I'd go for limestone. $\endgroup$ – Gimelist Feb 7 '17 at 21:37
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    $\begingroup$ You're right Michael, I overlooked halite. $\endgroup$ – Gary Kindel Feb 8 '17 at 0:48
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So, What I found is that the white rock could possibly be a art rock that people used to make art. I also know that there is something called a black rock in the middle of a white rock. I think you might be thinking of that.

enter image description here

This might be it.

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