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Crater is above a vent whereas a vent is below it. All the best....

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closed as off-topic by John, Jan Doggen, trond hansen, arkaia, Peter Jansson Jun 2 at 12:31

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  • $\begingroup$ please give some information and upload a picture or give us .a link to make it clear what you realy are asking. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Feb 23 '17 at 9:37
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because homework questions are expected to show some attempt to answer them. $\endgroup$ – John Jun 1 at 12:28
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A vent opens through the side of a volcano, somewhere on its slopes. The crater (and neck) can seal itself up, solidify over a period of inactivity, then re-open anew nearby to form a new crater. Magma will more readily move through the interface between a solidified neck and surrounding ash matrix than it will through the center of a solidified neck alone.

Multiple craters atop Olympus Mons

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    $\begingroup$ I do not understand what that picture is supposed to demonstrate. Can you clarify what you are showing here? Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Sep 27 '17 at 7:57
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    $\begingroup$ the picture is a caldera on mars and is not a good ilustration to the answer, it is not showing a vent or a volcanic crater(it is a type of crater but not what i think of when people mentions volcanoes)maby replace the picture whith one from earth?. $\endgroup$ – trond hansen Oct 3 '17 at 8:16
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A crater is what you can see on the top of a volcano and the vent is the tube leading to the crater. Sometimes fissures on the volcano can make a secondary volcanic cone if a volcano is a long periodic one which allows the magma to go sideways where the resistance might be lower. https://golearngeo.wordpress.com/2010/02/24/volcano-features/

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