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Questions tagged [laboratory]

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3
votes
1answer
96 views

Is there a high-temperature, non-magnetic glue that doesn't dissolve in water?

I have very small mineral samples, and I'm looking for a glue that can hold them through a sample preparation process that I'm doing: heating, polishing, and measuring magnetic moment. For that I want ...
4
votes
1answer
63 views

Can the formation of gypsum evaporites (sand roses) be simulated in the lab?

Has the process of formation of sand roses been simulated in laboratory conditions, or does it take too long?
2
votes
2answers
308 views

How to find molarity of a fertilizer?

I want to add nitrogen to my soil samples in a lab as fertilizer (ammonium nitrate). I need to add it equivalent of 50 kgN/ha. I have a clump of soil, that weighs 20g. What is the best way to convert ...
8
votes
0answers
106 views

A faster way to measure the rock magnetic S-ratio?

The S-ratio is commonly used in rock magnetic and enviromagnetic studies to quantify the relative abundances of minerals with high and low remanent coercivities. As most frequently defined (e.g. by ...
8
votes
1answer
276 views

Laboratory simulation of the Earth's magnetic field

I remember reading an article where a scientist was able to make a spinning iron tube with liquid nickel inside and it created a magnetic field, providing a laboratory-scale simulation of the ...
15
votes
8answers
7k views

Is it possible to create an enclosed manmade weather system?

There are plenty of experiments, usually geared toward kids, that involve "making a cloud in a bottle" or something similar. These exercises are neat for what they are, but pale in comparison to the ...
13
votes
1answer
293 views

What can I use as a heatproof, non-magnetic glue for samples?

I, and many of my palaeomagnetist colleagues, often use thermal demagnetization (potentially up to 800°C) in our studies. Usually a stepwise technique is employed, so each sample is heated -- often 20 ...