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1
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. This does control the cleavage direction but there are other cubic minerals where the ion sizes and charge mean the cleavage is stronger in different directions. A good example is fluorite, calcium fluoride, which often forms cubic-shaped crystals but has octahedral cleavage. …
answered Jun 20 '17 by haresfur
4
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the surface of minerals like clay minerals can exchange with ions in solution changing the concentrations and causing precipitation. Two different compositions of water can mix to cause minerals to … precipitate. Changing temperature can also make minerals precipitate. Changing the pH or oxidation state affects the solubility of various minerals. Increasing the pH will cause precipitation of …
answered Nov 6 '17 by haresfur
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The white areas appear to be formed on the edge of elevated parts of the landscape and in low-lying flat areas. You can see this if you use Google Earth and looking at the elevation profiles along pat …
answered May 26 '17 by haresfur
2
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Kinetics certainly can limit precipitation of minerals from solution. This could be due to the inherently slow precipitation for a particular mineral or could be due to more rapid precipitation of …
answered Nov 22 '17 by haresfur
6
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Remember that you are concerned about stability fields. The lines on your stability diagram are the places where two minerals are in equilibrium. One one side one mineral will be more stable, on the … minerals are less stable than anything else. Good luck and let us know if you get stuck. I didn't want to just give you the answer because I'd have to actually work it out. …
answered Oct 9 '15 by haresfur
1
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This one is going to be hard to identify from a picture but the reddish crystal in the lower picture appears to be garnet and the matrix, mostly biotite. So I'd call it a garnet-biotite schist. The ho …
answered Feb 27 by haresfur
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I believe the large white crystals are perthite - orthoclase (potassium feldspar) that has exolved to form intergrowths of sodium-rich albite feldspar.
answered Jul 17 '17 by haresfur
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Magnesium sulfate is considerably more soluble than calcium sulfate. What happens during evaporation will depend on the original ion concentrations but, for example with sea water, evaporation will ca …
answered Jan 2 '18 by haresfur
2
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Although garnet is hard it can fracture and break apart. As the rest of the rock erodes as it tumbles around in the high-energy environment that rounded the cobble, any bits that might stick up can br …
answered Oct 16 '16 by haresfur
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Why don't you think calcite is forming in-situ? The saturation index does not guarantee that calcite has precipitated (or dissolved) but there are a number of reasons to think it has. First, calcite d …
answered Jan 2 '18 by haresfur
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Quartz, based on the fracture and colour. The red is iron oxide staining. It is most likely from a quartz vein.
answered Mar 15 by haresfur
4
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They are not synonymous. Cleavage means breaking along planes defined by crystallographic directions. For example, cubic crystals like halite, NaCl, often cleave along directions that follow the cub …
answered Mar 24 by haresfur