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4
votes
I haven't come across the vertical p-velocity, so I am unsure what that is trying to communicate. w is the vertical velocity with units of length per second. Travelling away from the surface means th …
answered Jun 25 '16 by BarocliniCplusplus
1
vote
There are a number of causes, for a variety of scales. Generally speaking, you can boil it down to convergence/divergence, as a continuity of mass problem, or buoyant motion. You can refer to the ver …
answered Apr 14 '16 by BarocliniCplusplus
1
vote
It will vary, but in general it will be windier on a mountain than in a valley. An explanation: What slows down wind? Friction. In the valley, there is more friction than on the mountain. Note … that the fastest wind gust in the US was recorded on Mount Washington with a 200 knot gust. On Mount Washington, buildings have to be chained down to the ground, to prvent destruction. Now there are …
answered Mar 1 '17 by BarocliniCplusplus
0
votes
Put simply, the coriolis 'force' doesn't change wind speed, but the direction the wind blows. I would say that the winds would become much faster. Consider these facts: The speed of the wind is …
answered Feb 2 '18 by BarocliniCplusplus
4
votes
$\vec{u}$ is the atmospheric motion vector (wind + vertical motion), $\rho$ is density, $P$ is pressure, $g$ is gravity, $f$ is the coriolis parameter, and $\nu$ is the kinematic viscosity. This very …
answered Aug 23 '17 by BarocliniCplusplus
2
votes
}\phi)$$ where $\phi$ is the wind direction in the meteorological system, and $|\vec{v}|$ is the wind speed. Having calculated $u$ and $v$, you can plot the wind barbs by following the example found at this site. …
answered Aug 3 '17 by BarocliniCplusplus
7
votes
Yes, the GFS model is a global model. The data is released in the public domain, so you can use it for free for any lawful purpose. See complete terms of use here. You can get the data here.
answered Mar 20 '18 by BarocliniCplusplus
3
votes
1answer
The maximum potential intensity (MPI) is a computed quantity that often sets a maximum bound for maximum hurricane wind speed, though rarely, the wind speeds observed can exceed it. MPI is based off …
asked Sep 8 '17 by BarocliniCplusplus
7
votes
Yes, but it may not be valid. The extrapolation will be valid for about 0.1 * PBL Height using the Log-Wind Profile You will need: PBL Height. A second Wind speed (within 0.1*PBL Height) Surface … the friction velocity and surface roughness length using the log-wind profile and $\psi(\frac{z}{L})$. Once you have those two, you can extrapolate wind speed 600 meters up, provided the surface layer is that high. …
answered May 30 '17 by BarocliniCplusplus
3
votes
vapor, and other materials that form your breath would need to move, otherwise you would asphyxiate. That movement can be classified as wind, therefore wind exists. Concerning the reference to your … slows the wind down. Since the air closest to the ground is slower than the air a bit further from the ground, there must be shear. Therefore shear is unavoidable. For this entire monologue, I have …
answered Dec 4 '16 by BarocliniCplusplus