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3

As an expansion of Fred's anwer: Some of these oxides in question are well recognized and intentionally used. Thus some of them are used to desinfect water replacing elementary chlorine gas. They and their derivatives are not very stable (e.g., $\ce{ClO2}$, and $\ce{HClO}$) because during their decomposition organic matter degrades. Take, for example, ...


4

Classifying the presence of halogen oxides in the atmosphere as either natural, pollution or mixed bag, would result in mixed bag. Natural sources of halogen oxides include the ocean and volcanoes. In 1963, Duce et al, showed that bromine, like chlorine, was lost from the sea salt particles Volcanoes are another source of halogen oxides, Halogens ...


-4

Bromine and chlorine are very reactive, so are always found as compounds. They are fairly common elements, mainly in the oceans but also in the Earth's crust. Both have industrial uses, and both damage the Earth's ozone layer. They are evaporated from the ocean by strong sunlight in the form of oxides (BrO and ClO), and in trace amounts are natural ...


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