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Water has lowest EM absorption in the blue part of light spectrum and increases rapidly towards both UV and red parts of spectrum. As a result in visible light water is blue. Same goes for the ice as it has very similar absorption spectrum. While there is a lot of white in the picture, all of it is a thin snow cover on top of blue ice. Once the snow ...


15

"Transparent" is not the same as "white" : white bodies reflect most of the light while transparent bodies let the light though. Once the light enters into water, it may need to travel a long way before it has a chance to go out, and that long travel path provides more opportunities for absorption. Water absorbs light by itself much more than snow, but ...


4

Yes. So far as aquifers are concerned, Antarctica is just like any other continent. The Ice is 4 kilometres thick in places, but at the bottom there is water. If there is any place where water is not found at the base of the ice sheet, there will be an aquifer within a few miles. There are about 400 sub-glacial lakes in Antarctica, the most well known being ...


1

Water (solid or liquid) has some absorbtion. It is rather low for pure water for visible or near-visible light and that's why water it is considered transparent. But only to an extent - few meters of water look blue and few hundred meters look black, esp. if you are UNDER those few hundred meters. Then we have snow. Snow has an abundance of optical ...


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